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How to generate random password

pacman created at5 months ago view count: 18

command

base64 < /dev/urandom | head -c 12

result

CrJMEmHp3lcK

base64

Base64 encode or decode FILE, or standard input, to standard output.

With no FILE, or when FILE is -, read standard input.

Mandatory arguments to long options are mandatory for short options too.

-d, --decode
decode data
-i, --ignore-garbage
when decoding, ignore non-alphabet characters
-w, --wrap=,COLS/
wrap encoded lines after COLS character (default 76). Use 0 to disable line wrapping
--help
display this help and exit
--version
output version information and exit

The data are encoded as described for the base64 alphabet in RFC 4648. When decoding, the input may contain newlines in addition to the bytes of the formal base64 alphabet. Use --ignore-garbage to attempt to recover from any other non-alphabet bytes in the encoded stream.  

head

Print the first 10 lines of each FILE to standard output. With more than one FILE, precede each with a header giving the file name.

With no FILE, or when FILE is -, read standard input.

Mandatory arguments to long options are mandatory for short options too.

-c, --bytes=,[-]NUM/
print the first NUM bytes of each file; with the leading '-', print all but the last NUM bytes of each file
-n, --lines=,[-]NUM/
print the first NUM lines instead of the first 10; with the leading '-', print all but the last NUM lines of each file
-q, --quiet, --silent
never print headers giving file names
-v, --verbose
always print headers giving file names
-z, --zero-terminated
line delimiter is NUL, not newline
--help
display this help and exit
--version
output version information and exit

NUM may have a multiplier suffix: b 512, kB 1000, K 1024, MB 1000*1000, M 1024*1024, GB 1000*1000*1000, G 1024*1024*1024, and so on for T, P, E, Z, Y. Binary prefixes can be used, too: KiB=K, MiB=M, and so on.  

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